Python List Append VS Python List Extend - Η διαφορά που εξηγείται με παραδείγματα μεθόδου Array

? Καλώς ήλθατε

Αν θέλετε να μάθετε πώς να εργαστεί με .append()και .extend()και να κατανοήσουν τις διαφορές τους, τότε έχετε έρθει στο σωστό μέρος. Είναι ισχυρές μέθοδοι λίστας που σίγουρα θα χρησιμοποιήσετε στα έργα σας Python.

Σε αυτό το άρθρο, θα μάθετε:

  • Πώς και πότε να χρησιμοποιήσετε τη .append()μέθοδο.
  • Πώς και πότε να χρησιμοποιήσετε τη .extend()μέθοδο.
  • Οι κύριες διαφορές τους.

Ας ξεκινήσουμε. ✨

? Προσάρτηση

Ας δούμε πώς λειτουργεί η .append()μέθοδος πίσω από τα παρασκήνια.

Χρησιμοποιήστε Θήκες

Θα πρέπει να χρησιμοποιήσετε αυτήν τη μέθοδο όταν θέλετε να προσθέσετε ένα μεμονωμένο στοιχείο στο τέλος μιας λίστας.

? Συμβουλές: Μπορείτε να προσθέσετε στοιχεία οποιουδήποτε τύπου δεδομένων, καθώς οι λίστες μπορούν να έχουν στοιχεία διαφορετικών τύπων δεδομένων.

Σύνταξη και Επιχειρήματα

Για να καλέσετε τη .append()μέθοδο, θα πρέπει να χρησιμοποιήσετε αυτήν τη σύνταξη:

Απο αριστερά προς δεξιά:

  • Η λίστα που θα τροποποιηθεί. Αυτή είναι συνήθως μια μεταβλητή που αναφέρεται σε μια λίστα.
  • Μια τελεία, ακολουθούμενη από το όνομα της μεθόδου .append().
  • Εντός παρενθέσεων, το στοιχείο που θα προστεθεί στο τέλος της λίστας.

? Συμβουλές: Η τελεία είναι πολύ σημαντική. Αυτό ονομάζεται "dot notation". Η κουκκίδα λέει βασικά "καλέστε αυτήν τη μέθοδο σε αυτήν τη συγκεκριμένη λίστα", οπότε το αποτέλεσμα της μεθόδου θα εφαρμοστεί στη λίστα που βρίσκεται πριν από την τελεία.

Παραδείγματα

Ακολουθεί ένα παράδειγμα του τρόπου χρήσης .append():

# Define the list >>> nums = [1, 2, 3, 4] # Add the integer 5 to the end of the existing list >>> nums.append(5) # See the updated value of the list >>> nums [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]

? Συμβουλές: Όταν χρησιμοποιείτε .append()την αρχική λίστα τροποποιείται. Η μέθοδος δεν δημιουργεί αντίγραφο της λίστας - αλλάζει την αρχική λίστα στη μνήμη.

Ας προσποιηθούμε ότι διεξάγουμε μια έρευνα και ότι θέλουμε να αναλύσουμε τα δεδομένα που συλλέχθηκαν χρησιμοποιώντας το Python. Πρέπει να προσθέσουμε μια νέα μέτρηση στην υπάρχουσα λίστα τιμών.

Πώς να το κάνουμε; Χρησιμοποιούμε τη .append()μέθοδο!

Μπορείτε να το δείτε εδώ:

# Existing list >>> nums = [5.6, 7.44, 6.75, 4.56, 2.3] # Add the float (decimal number) to the end of the existing list >>> nums.append(7.34) # See the updated value of the list >>> nums [5.6, 7.44, 6.75, 4.56, 2.3, 7.34]

Ισοδυναμεί με...

Εάν είστε εξοικειωμένοι με τη συμβολοσειρά, τη λίστα ή τον τεμαχισμό tuple, αυτό που .append()πραγματικά κάνει πίσω από τα παρασκήνια είναι ισοδύναμο με:

a[len(a):] = [x]

Με αυτό το παράδειγμα, μπορείτε να δείτε ότι είναι ισοδύναμα.

Χρησιμοποιώντας .append():

>>> nums = [5.6, 7.44, 6.75, 4.56, 2.3] >>> nums.append(4.52) >>> nums [5.6, 7.44, 6.75, 4.56, 2.3, 4.52]

Χρήση κοπής λίστας:

>>> nums = [5.6, 7.44, 6.75, 4.56, 2.3] >>> nums[len(nums):] = [4.52] >>> nums [5.6, 7.44, 6.75, 4.56, 2.3, 4.52]

Προσάρτηση μιας ακολουθίας

Τώρα, τι πιστεύετε για αυτό το παράδειγμα; Τι πιστεύετε ότι θα είναι το αποτέλεσμα;

>>> nums = [5.6, 7.44, 6.75, 4.56, 2.3] >>> nums.append([5.67, 7.67, 3.44]) >>> nums # OUTPUT?

Είσαι έτοιμος? Αυτό θα είναι το αποτέλεσμα:

[5.6, 7.44, 6.75, 4.56, 2.3, [5.67, 7.67, 3.44]]

Ίσως να ρωτάτε, γιατί προστέθηκε η πλήρης λίστα ως ενιαίο στοιχείο; Είναι επειδή η .append()μέθοδος προσθέτει ολόκληρο το στοιχείο στο τέλος της λίστας. Εάν το στοιχείο είναι μια ακολουθία όπως μια λίστα, λεξικό ή πλειάδα, ολόκληρη η ακολουθία θα προστεθεί ως ένα μόνο στοιχείο της υπάρχουσας λίστας.

Εδώ έχουμε ένα άλλο παράδειγμα (παρακάτω). Σε αυτήν την περίπτωση, το στοιχείο είναι πλειάδα και προστίθεται ως μεμονωμένο στοιχείο της λίστας και όχι ως μεμονωμένα στοιχεία:

>>> names = ["Lulu", "Nora", "Gino", "Bryan"] >>> names.append(("Emily", "John")) >>> names ['Lulu', 'Nora', 'Gino', 'Bryan', ('Emily', 'John')]

? Επέκταση

Τώρα ας δούμε τη λειτουργικότητα της .extend()μεθόδου.

Χρησιμοποιήστε Θήκες

Θα πρέπει να χρησιμοποιήσετε αυτήν τη μέθοδο εάν πρέπει να προσθέσετε πολλά στοιχεία σε μια λίστα ως μεμονωμένα στοιχεία .

Let me illustrate the importance of this method with a familiar friend that you just learned: the .append() method. Based on what you've learned so far, if we wanted to add several individual items to a list using .append(), we would need to use .append() several times, like this:

# List that we want to modify >>> nums = [5.6, 7.44, 6.75, 4.56, 2.3] # Appending the items >>> nums.append(2.3) >>> nums.append(9.6) >>> nums.append(4.564) >>> nums.append(7.56) # Updated list >>> nums [5.6, 7.44, 6.75, 4.56, 2.3, 2.3, 9.6, 4.564, 7.56]

I'm sure that you are probably thinking that this would not be very efficient, right? What if I need to add thousands or millions of values? I cannot write thousands or millions of lines for this simple task. That would take forever!

So let's see an alternative. We can store the values that we want to add in a separate list and then use a for loop to call .append() as many times as needed:

# List that we want to modify >>> nums = [5.6, 7.44, 6.75, 4.56, 2.3] # Values that we want to add >>> new_values = [2.3, 9.6, 4.564, 7.56] # For loop that is going to append the value >>> for num in new_values: nums.append(num) # Updated value of the list >>> nums [5.6, 7.44, 6.75, 4.56, 2.3, 2.3, 9.6, 4.564, 7.56]

This is more efficient, right? We are only writing a few lines. But there is an even more efficient, readable, and compact way to achieve the same purpose: .extend()!

>>> nums = [5.6, 7.44, 6.75, 4.56, 2.3] >>> new_values = [2.3, 9.6, 4.564, 7.56] # This is where the magic occurs! No more for loops >>> nums.extend(new_values) # The list was updated with individual values >>> nums [5.6, 7.44, 6.75, 4.56, 2.3, 2.3, 9.6, 4.564, 7.56]

Let's see how this method works behind the scenes.

Syntax and Arguments

To call the .extend() method, you will need to use this syntax:

From Left to Right:

  • The list that will be modified. This is usually a variable that refers to the list.
  • A dot . (So far, everything is exactly the same as before).
  • The name of the method extend. (Now things start to change...).
  • Within parentheses, an iterable (list, tuple, dictionary, set, or string) that contains the items that will be added as individual elements of the list.

? Tips: According to the Python documentation, an iterable is defined as "an object capable of returning its members one at a time". Iterables can be used in a for loop and because they return their elements one at a time, we can "do something" with each one of them, one per iteration.

Behind the Scenes

Let's see how .extend() works behind the scenes. Here we have an example:

# List that will be modified >>> a = [1, 2, 3, 4] # Sequence of values that we want to add to the list a >>> b = [5, 6, 7] # Calling .extend() >>> a.extend(b) # See the updated list. Now the list a has the values 5, 6, and 7 >>> a [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7]

You can think of .extend() as a method that appends the individual elements of the iterable in the same order as they appear.

In this case, we have a list a = [1, 2, 3, 4] as illustrated in the diagram below. We also have a list b = [5, 6, 7] that contains the sequence of values that we want to add. The method takes each element of b and appends it to list a in the same order.

After this process is completed, we have the updated list a and we can work with the values as individual elements of a.

? Tips: The list b used to extend list a remains intact after this process. You can work with it after the call to .extend(). Here is the proof:

>>> a = [1, 2, 3, 4] >>> b = [5, 6, 7] >>> a.extend(b) >>> a [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7] # List b is intact! >>> b [5, 6, 7]

Examples

You may be curious to know how the .extend() method works when you pass different types of iterables. Let's see how in the following examples:

For tuples:

The process works exactly the same if you pass a tuple. The individual elements of the tuple are appended one by one in the order that they appear.

# List that will be extended >>> a = [1, 2, 3, 4] # Values that will be added (the iterable is a tuple!) >>> b = (1, 2, 3, 4) # Method call >>> a.extend(b) # The value of the list a was updated >>> a [1, 2, 3, 4, 1, 2, 3, 4]

For sets:

The same occurs if you pass a set. The elements of the set are appended one by one.

# List that will be extended >>> a = [1, 2, 3, 4] # Values that will be appended (the iterable is a set!) >>> c = {5, 6, 7} # Method call >>> a.extend(c) # The value of a was updated >>> a [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7]

For strings:

Strings work a little bit different with the .extend() method. Each character of the string is considered an "item", so the characters are appended one by one in the order that they appear in the string.

# List that will be extended >>> a = ["a", "b", "c"] # String that will be used to extend the list >>> b = "Hello, World!" # Method call >>> a.extend(b) # The value of a was updated >>> a ['a', 'b', 'c', 'H', 'e', 'l', 'l', 'o', ',', ' ', 'W', 'o', 'r', 'l', 'd', '!']

For dictionaries:

Dictionaries have a particular behavior when you pass them as arguments to .extend(). In this case, the keys of the dictionary are appended one by one. The values of the corresponding key-value pairs are not appended.

In this example (below), the keys are "d", "e", and "f". These values are appended to the list a.

# List that will be extended >>> a = ["a", "b", "c"] # Dictionary that will be used to extend the list >>> b = {"d": 5, "e": 6, "f": 7} # Method call >>> a.extend(b) # The value of a was updated >>> a ['a', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'e', 'f']

Equivalent to...

What .extend() does is equivalent to a[len(a):] = iterable. Here we have an example to illustrate that they are equivalent:

Using .extend():

# List that will be extended >>> a = [1, 2, 3, 4] # Values that will be appended >>> b = (6, 7, 8) # Method call >>> a.extend(b) # The list was updated >>> a [1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8] 

Using list slicing:

# List that will be extended >>> a = [1, 2, 3, 4] # Values that will be appended >>> b = (6, 7, 8) # Assignment statement. Assign the iterable b as the final portion of the list a >>> a[len(a):] = b # The value of a was updated >>> a [1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8]

The result is the same, but using .extend() is much more readable and compact, right? Python truly offers amazing tools to improve our workflow.

? Summary of their Differences

Now that you know how to work with .append() and .extend(), let's see a summary of their key differences:

  • Effect: .append() adds a single element to the end of the list while .extend() can add multiple individual elements to the end of the list.
  • Argument: .append() takes a single element as argument while .extend() takes an iterable as argument (list, tuple, dictionaries, sets, strings).

I really hope that you liked my article and found it helpful. Now you can work with .append() and .extend() in your Python projects. Check out my online courses. Follow me on Twitter. ⭐️